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  • Fq977t815?file=thumbnail
    Description:

    The Conference Proceedings collection houses papers and ephemera from twenty eight conferences hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Research Department between 1994 and 2003. Additional papers from other Minneapolis Research Department conferences can be found at the Minneapolis Fed conferences and programs website.

  • Mg74qm17c?file=thumbnail
    Description:

    This collection contains physical items and other non-published ephemera produced by the Minneapolis Fed's Research Department.

  • Vm40xr59d?file=thumbnail
    Description:

    The Working Papers collection houses the working papers written by Minneapolis Fed Research Department economists and affiliated scholars between 1963 and 2008, with the bulk of the material dating between 1970 and 1994. More recent working papers can be found at the Minneapolis Fed website.

  • Research Data

    Collection
    Collection
    Description:

    A collection of data, code, tools and supplemental materials that accompany articles created by economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Files are given the same name as the corresponding paper’s title.

  • C247ds185?file=thumbnail
    Description:

    Please note: this collection is the new home of the greatdepressionsbook.com website. Scroll down to see the accompanying data for each chapter of the book. The computer programs needed to calibrate the neoclassical growth model and then solve the model numerically, using data from Finland as an example, are included in the list of works but can also be found here.

    The worldwide Great Depression of the 1930s was a watershed for both economic thought and economic policymaking. It led to the belief that market economies are inherently unstable and to the revolutionary work of John Maynard Keynes. Its impact on popular economic wisdom is still apparent today.

    This book, which uses a common framework to study sixteen depressions, from the interwar period in Europe and America as well as from more recent times in Japan and Latin America, challenges the Keynesian theory of depressions. It develops and uses a methodology for studying depressions that relies on growth accounting and the general equilibrium growth model.

    Each chapter of the book is accompanied by a data file that contains all of the data used in the analysis. This collection also provides links to computer programs for applying the methodology.