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Filtering by: Creator McGrattan, Ellen R. Remove constraint Creator: McGrattan, Ellen R. Creator Prescott, Edward C. Remove constraint Creator: Prescott, Edward C. Series Working paper (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Research Department) Remove constraint Series: Working paper (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Research Department) Subject (JEL) F23 - Multinational Firms; International Business Remove constraint Subject (JEL): F23 - Multinational Firms; International Business

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  • Pr76f352c?file=thumbnail
    Creator: Holmes, Thomas J., McGrattan, Ellen R., and Prescott, Edward C.
    Series: Working paper (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Research Department)
    Number: 687
    Abstract:

    It is widely believed that an important factor underlying the rapid growth in China is increased foreign direct investment (FDI) and the transfer of foreign technology capital, which is accumulated know-how from investment in research and development (R&D), brands, and organizations that is not specific to a plant. In this paper, we study two channels through which FDI can contribute to upgrading of the stock of technology capital: knowledge spillovers and appropriation. Knowledge spillovers lead to new ideas that do not directly compete or devalue the foreign affiliate's stock. Appropriation, on the other hand, implies a redistribution of property rights over patents and trademarks; the gain to domestic companies comes at a loss to the multinational company (MNC). In this paper we build these sources of technology capital transfer into the framework developed by McGrattan and Prescott (2009, 2010) and introduce an endogenously-chosen intensity margin for operating technology capital in order to capture the trade-offs MNCs face when expanding their markets internationally. We first demonstrate that abstracting from technology capital transfers results in predicted bilateral FDI inflows to China that are grossly at odds with the data. We then use the bilateral inflows to parameterize the model with technology capital transfers and compute the global economic impact of Chinese policies that encouraged greater inflows of FDI and technology capital transfers. Microevidence on automobile patents is used to support our parameter choices and main findings.

    Subject (JEL): O34 - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital, O33 - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes, F41 - Open Economy Macroeconomics, and F23 - Multinational Firms; International Business
  • 70795776v?file=thumbnail
    Creator: McGrattan, Ellen R. and Prescott, Edward C.
    Series: Working paper (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Research Department)
    Number: 646
    Abstract:

    Over the period 1982–2006, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) estimates the return on investments of foreign subsidiaries of U.S. multinational companies averaged 9.4 percent per year after taxes while U.S. subsidiaries of foreign multinationals earned on average only 3.2 percent. We estimate the importance of two factors that distort BEA returns: technology capital and plant-specific intangible capital. Technology capital is accumulated know-how from intangible investments in R&D, brands, and organizations that can be used in foreign and domestic locations. Technology capital used abroad generates profits for foreign subsidiaries with no foreign direct investment. Plant-specific intangible capital in foreign subsidiaries is expensed abroad, lowering current profits on foreign direct investment (FDI) and increasing future profits. We develop a multicountry general equilibrium model with an essential role for FDI and apply the same methodology as the BEA to construct economic statistics for the model economy. We estimate that mismeasurement of intangible investments accounts for over 60 percent of the difference in BEA returns.

    Subject (JEL): F32 - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements and F23 - Multinational Firms; International Business
  • Mc87pq37m?file=thumbnail
    Creator: McGrattan, Ellen R. and Prescott, Edward C.
    Series: Working paper (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Research Department)
    Number: 651
    Abstract:

    A framework is developed with what we call technology capital. A country is a measure of locations. Absent policy constraints, a firm owning a unit of technology capital can produce the composite output good using the unit of technology capital at as many locations as it chooses. But it can operate only one operation at a given location, so the number of locations is what constrains the number of units it operates using this unit of technology capital. If it has two units of technology capital, it can operate twice as many operations at every location. In this paper, aggregation is carried out and the aggregate production functions for the countries are derived. Our framework interacts well with the national accounts in the same way as does the neoclassical growth model. It also interacts well with the international accounts. There are constant returns to scale, and therefore no monopoly rents. Yet there are gains to being economically integrated. In the framework, a country’s openness is measured by the effect of its policies on the productivity of foreign operations. Our analysis indicates that there are large gains to this openness.

    Keyword: Openness and Foreign direct investment
    Subject (JEL): O11 - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development, F23 - Multinational Firms; International Business, and F43 - Economic Growth of Open Economies